Business / Managerial Communication

Managerial Communication

This essay Managerial Communication is available for you on Essays24.com! Search Term Papers, College Essay Examples and Free Essays on Essays24.com - full papers database.

Autor:  anton  13 July 2010
Tags: 
Words: 18209   |   Pages: 73
Views: 720

STM

School of Technology and Management

Course Outline

April 2010

Pre- Masters

Programme leading to

Master of Business Administration

Assignment Deadline

22 June 2010

Course Administrator:

Adrian Canty: adrian.canty@lsclondon.co.uk

Contents

Managerial Communication - - 3

Subject Outline

Lecture Sequence

Assignment

Accounting and Decision Making Techniques - 7

Subject Outline

Lecture Sequence

Assignment

Management Theories and Practice - 11

Subject Outline

Lecture Sequence

Assignment

Information Technologies and Systems - 15

Subject Outline

Lecture Sequence

Assignment

Module Title: Managerial Communication

Module Lecturer: Tatiana Pavlovsky

1. Module Description:

This module is designed to refine communication skills for immediate, course-long and life-long benefit. It focuses specifically on ways students can improve their skills in business.

The formal study of communication at higher education level is relatively new, but it is already very popular and becoming more so each year. This reflects a proper and rapidly increasing awareness of the subject's importance. Effective communication is essential to success in every area of human endeavour. Apart from being a prerequisite to the health and harmony of individuals, groups and whole societies, it is essential to business efficiency and effective management.

Good communicators are able to respond appropriately in predictable and unpredictable situations, because they are aware of the range of communication strategies available, and they can recognise which are best to use in various contexts.

This module also provides an opportunity for students to practice and hone existing skills, and in addition, it will introduce them to new and more incisive approaches to communication.

2. Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this module students will be able to:

• develop an approach to study that aligns their learning-mode preference,

• recognise variables in the communication process, understanding their interdependence and appreciating their importance, particularly from a management point of view;

• recognise the personal attitudes and dispositions that underpin effective communication in various contexts, and have practised interpersonal skills in various situations;

• demonstrate refined oral language skills so that one is able to speak clearly, persuasively and effectively in different contexts;

• demonstrate refined written language skills so that one is able to write clearly, correctly and concisely in appropriate modes and registers;

• demonstrate an awareness that there is much more to a message than the meaning conveyed by medium of the words that encode it, and have practised ‘reading' different aspects of non-verbal communication;

• recognise cultural variations in communication styles and have recognised the growing importance of this,

• adopt a contemporary view of organisations and be able to identify communication styles and practices which usually accompany various managerial approaches and technique,;

• undertake public communication and use relevant public communication strategies and tactics,

• understand what constitutes ethical communication practice.

3. Indicative Content

The module begins with an analysis of the theory that underpins modern studies of human communication. Through an examination of various models, the students will become familiar with the variables operating in any communication transaction, improving their ability to identify the causes of communication effectiveness - and of communication breakdown.

These insights are implemented through a focus on the receptive communication processes; listening and reading. This will lead to some implications for learning in general, and assignment and examination preparation in particular.

Prior to the productive communication processes (speaking and writing), students consider mental processes which, when mastered, give soundly-based authority to their arguments. Then, since much of communication has a persuasive intent, they will examine the ways communication receivers process information.

Students will practise some of these research-based techniques that lead to clearer, more concise and correct written communication in all contexts. Their refined skills will be given a business communication focus as they prepare memos, letters and faxes, reports, submissions and brochures.

Most of workplace communication is oral, i.e. giving directions, offering suggestions, making recommendations and assisting others to solve problems. So, students shall look at effective oral communication in a variety of workplace contexts: leading a discussion or formal meetings and managing a conversation. The last section of the subject deals with organisational communication.

4. Delivery

A variety of teaching approaches is used, including lectures, seminars, role plays, presentations, teamwork and extensive use of the Internet for guided research.

Notional Student Workload

Lectures 18 hours

Seminars 7.5 hours

Directed Learning 15 hours

Independent Learning 40.5 hours

Formal Assessment 3 hours

Total 84 hours

5. Assessment

• 2 Assignments 100%

6. Indicative Reading List

Core Text :- Thill J. V., Courtland L. Bovee C.L. (2008) Excellence in Business Communication, (8th edn) Pearson International Edition.

Recommended Reading

Adler, R.B and Elmhorst J.M. (2010) Communicating at Work, (10th edn) McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages

Laborde GZ (1998) Influencing with Integrity: Management Skills for Communication and Negotiation Crown House Publishing

Cooper C and Theobald, T (2004) Shut Up and Listen! The Truth about How to Communicate at Work, Kogan Page

7. Lecture Sequence

|Lecture |Topics |Recommended reading |

| |Perspectives of Communication. |Blundel R, Ippolito K (2008), Effective |

| |Your own Communication Skills |Organisational Communication |

| |Communicating with others |(pg. 1-23) |

| |Group Seminar – Testing your communication skills | |

| |Intrapersonal Considerations |Blundel R, Ippolito K (2008), Effective |

| |Dealing with different personalities |Organisational Communication |

| |Dealing with different styles |(pg. 27-57) |

| |Social, cultural and ethical barriers | |

| |Intrapersonal Considerations |Blundel R, Ippolito K (2008), Effective |

| |Dealing with different personalities |Organisational Communication |

| |Dealing with different styles |(pg. 27-57) |

| |Social, cultural and ethical barriers | |

| |Communicating beyond and within the organisation |Readings related to Organisational |

| |Internal communication |culture and structures as well as in |

| |External communication |Blundel R, Ippolito K (2008), Effective |

| | |Organisational Communication |

| | |(pg. 165 to195 and |

| |Group Seminar – Case Study | |

| |Functional writing techniques |Cameron S. (2005, 5th ed.) The MBA |

| | |Handbook (pg. 273273 to 313) and Blundel|

| | |R, Ippolito K (2008), Effective |

| | |Organisational Communication (pg.229 to |

| | |255) |

| |Assignment focus | |

| |Communication in the context of change management |Blundel R, Ippolito K |

| |Communicating a plan |(2008), Effective Organisational |

| |Giving instructions |Communication (pg. 174 – 194) |

| |Providing feedback | |

| |Communication in the context of change management |Blundel R, Ippolito K |

| |Communicating a plan |(2008), Effective Organisational |

| | |Communication (pg. 174 – 194) |

| |Giving instructions | |

| |Providing feedback | |

| |Group Seminar/Revision | |

| |Public speaking: Presentation and speeches |Blundel R, Ippolito K (2008), Effective |

| | |Organisational Communication |

| | |(pg. 317-348) |

| |Persuasive communication |Blundel R, Ippolito K (2008), Effective |

| |Challenges of persuasion |Organisational Communication |

| |Ethics of persuasion |(pg. 117 – 140) |

| |Group Seminar/Revision - Giving a presentation | |

| |Group Seminar/Revision - Giving a presentation | |

Module Title: Accounting and Decision Making Techniques

Module Lecturer: S. Palan

1. Module Description:

This module is designed to provide all business students with an overview of how accounting data is used in making business decisions. The subject covers a broad range of topics including the regulatory framework of accounting, preparation and analysis of financial statements, investment analysis and ethics in accounting. It provides students with basic skills, knowledge and attitudes that enable them to process financial data, to analyse and interpret accounting reports, and to present the results within an ethical framework, to financial decision makers.

The purpose of this module is also to develop the student's ability to use mathematics and statistics to solve business problems. The module provides a firm foundation in statistics and commonly used quantitative methods, which will prove useful in helping students to understand and appreciate other modules in our diploma and advanced diploma in Business and Management.

2. Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this module students will be able to:

• identify the role of accounting in society

• recognise that accounting is subject to a regulatory framework and appreciate how globalisation is impacting on accounting regulations

• utilise the general journal and general ledger to demonstrate double-entry accounting

• analyse financial transactions using the accounting equation

• prepare, analyse and interpret financial accounting reports

• employ ethics in accounting decision making

• employ problem based learning

• interpret data and reports

• understand statistical data analysis and some of the models used in business decision-making;

• appreciate different types of decision-making environments;

• identify the appropriate mathematical and statistical formulations for handling a range of business based problems;

• use computers to summarise, analyse and present data meaningfully.

3. Indicative Content

• Role of accounting in society: nature and use of accounting information in decision making, social and regulatory framework.

• Definition of key accounting terms.

• The general journal and general ledger as recording tools.

• The double entry rule and its application to the accounting (and expanded accounting) equation.

• The chart of accounts and a trial balance.

• Accounting information systems and how they work.

• Adjusting, closing and reversing entries.

• Internal controls, managing cash and ethical decision-making.

• Cash flow statements; use of cash by a business; direct method.

• Calculating and reporting values of property, plant equipment and intangible assets.

• Alternative profit plans using cost-volume-profit analysis.

• Manufacturing statements and record basic costing flows in T-accounts.

• Cost flows, and prepare general ledger entries for simple jobs; process costing examples.

• Introduction to statistics: collection of data, survey, coverage, pilot, analysis, interpretation and presentation, questionnaire design, sampling methods (random, non-random).

• Presentation of data: class limits, histograms, polygon, frequency curve and distribution, Bar and Pie charts, graphs (scatter, line, time, Break-even Z charts, Lorenz curves)

• Theory of probability: permutations and combinations; Decision Trees; binominal, Poisson and normal distributions; estimation; hypothesis testing:

Queuing theory: methods of measuring queues; methods of reducing queues; application of queuing theory

• Linear programming: formulation of problems; solution of problems; dual values; sensitivity analysis.

• Critical path analysis: collection of data; interpretation; controlling projects; benefits and limitations.

4. Delivery

A variety of teaching approaches is used, including lectures, seminars, case analysis, teamwork and extensive use of the Internet for guided research.

Notional Student Workload

Lectures 18 hours

Seminars 7.5 hours

Directed Learning 15 hours

Independent Learning 40.5 hours

Formal Assessment 3 hours

Total 84 hours

5. Assessment

The formal assessment of this module will be conducted through an assignment and a closed book examination..

• Assignment 30%

• Closed book examination 70%

The closed book examination will be of two hours duration

6. Indicative Reading List

Core Texts: Dyson, J.R. (2010) Accounting for Non-Accounting Students, (8th edn) FT Prentice Hall

Curwin J. and Slater R. (2007) Quantitative Methods for Business Decisions, (6th edn) Thomson Learning

Recommended Reading:

Lucey T (2007) Quantitative Techniques, Thomson Learning

Elliott, Barry and Elliot, Jamies (2008) Financial Accounting and Reporting, (12th edn) Prentice Hall

Horngren, Charles and Sundern, Garry (2008) Introduction to Management Accounting, (12th edn) Prentice Hall

Wood, Frank and Sangster, Alan (2008) Business Accounting 1, (11th edn) Prentice Hall

Wood, Frank and Sangster, Alan (2008) Business Accounting 2, (11th edn) Prentice Hall

Horngren, C. and Datar, S, (2008) Cost Accounting: A Managerial Approach, (13th edn) Pearson Education

7. Lecture Sequence

|Lecture |Topics |

| |Role of Accounting in society |

| |Introduction to Accounting Information Systems: Recording of Business |

| |Transactions |

| |Group Seminar/Assignment Focus |

| |General Journal and General Ledger |

| |Measuring Business Profit: The Adjusting Process |

| |Group Seminar/Revision |

| |Closing Entries, Reversing Entries and Financial Analysis |

| |Accounting for Retailing Operations, Internal Controls and Making Ethical |

| |Judgements |

| |Group Seminar/Revision |

| |The Statement of Cash Flows and its Relationship with the Statement of |

| |Financial Performance and Statement of Financial Position |

| |Accounts Receivable and Bills Receivable, |

| |Accounting for Inventory, Accounting for Non-Current Assets and Intangibles |

| |Manufacturing Statement, Master Budget, Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis |

| |Introduction to statistics and Probability |

| |Regression, Correlation and Queuing |

| |Linear Programming |

| |Critical Path Analysis |

| |Group Seminar/Revision |

| |Group Seminar/Revision |

Module Title: Management Theories and Practice

Module Lecturers: David Mwaura

1. Module Description:

This module examines fundamental management theories and traditional managerial responsibilities in formal and informal organisational structures. Planning, organising, directing, controlling and staffing are explored.

The module presents a thorough and systematic coverage of management theory and practice. It focuses on the basic roles, skills and functions of management, with special attention to managerial responsibility for the effective and efficient achievement of goals. Special attention is given to social responsibility, managerial ethics, and the importance of multi-national organisations.

This module also aims to introduce students to the history of reflections on ethics in the Western business world. It also focuses on providing students with a workable model of ethical decision making, helping them to practice as a professional or businessperson in an ethically responsible manner.

2. Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this module students will be able to :

• understand fundamental concepts and principles of management, including the basic roles, skills, and functions of management;

• discuss the historical development, theoretical aspects and practice application of managerial process;

• describe the interactions between the environment, technology, human resources, and organisations in order to achieve high performance;

• explain the ethical dilemmas faced by managers and the social responsibilities of businesses.

• explain the components and complexities of an organisation's culture and its impact on the manager.

• list the elements and steps in the rational decision making process and discuss decision making, including group decision making, as it currently is practiced, identifying the constraints that exist.

• understand the strategic management process.

• understand the nature of change in the organisation.

• discuss the various theories of motivation and develop useful guidelines in motivating employees.

• evaluate the alternative leadership styles and make a decision regarding their appropriate use.

• comment independently on the writings of the Western tradition on moral philosophy

• address a selection of common ethical dilemmas arising in business and professional life

• identify and respond to discrimination in the workplace

• describe the links between ethics and political economy

• understand and improve the ethical climate in their present or future place of work.

3. Indicative Content

• Managers and managing

• The evolution of management theory

• The environment of management.

• The global environment.

• Ethics, social responsibility, and diversity.

• The Manager as a decision maker, planner and strategist

• Management Organisational Structure

• Organisational Control and Culture

• Motivation and Leadership.

• Groups and teams

• Organisational conflict, negotiation, politics, and change

• Managing information systems and technologies

• The Management of innovation, product development, and entrepreneurship.

• History of ethical theories and concepts

• Ethics, morality and globalisation

• Social responsibility and social justice

• Environmental issues

4. Delivery

A variety of teaching approaches is used, including lectures, seminars, case analysis, teamwork and extensive student self-managed research.

Notional Student Workload

Lectures 18 hours

Seminars 7.5 hours

Directed Learning 15 hours

Independent Learning 40.5 hours

Formal Assessment 3 hours

Total 84 hours

5. Assessment

The formal assessment of this module will be conducted through an assignment and a closed book examination..

• Assignment 30%

• Closed book examination 70%

The closed book examination will be of two hours duration

6. Concise Indicative Reading List

Core Text: Robbins S.P.& Decenzo, D. A. (2008) Fundamentals of Management: Essential Concepts and Applications, (6th edn), Pearson Education (or an earlier edition)

Recommended Reading:

Hitt M.A., Black S.J. and Porter L.W. (2008) Management (2nd Edition) Pearson Education, Harlow-UK.

Robbins S.P. and Judge T.A (2010), Organisational Behaviour (14th Edition) Pearson Education/Prentice Hall

Mullins, L.J. (2007) Management and Organisational Behaviour (7th Edition) Pearson Education Ltd, Harlow-UK.

Bowie N.E. (2001) The Blackwell Guide to Business Ethics, (Philosophy Guides) Blackwell Publishers

Fitzsimmons, J. A & Fitzsimmons, M. J. (2010) Service Management: Operations Strategy, Information Technology, (7thEd) Singapore, McGraw Hill International Edition

Kennedy, C. (2007) Guide to the Management Gurus, (5th edn) Randon House Business Books.

7. Lecture Sequence

|Lecture |Topics |

| | Management For the Twenty-first Century |

| | |

| |Managing Team Effectively. |

| |Group Seminar/Assignment Focus |

| |Organisation Structure and Design |

| |Organisation Change and Innovation |

| |Managing Human Resources |

| |Managing Individuals and the Diversified workforce |

| |Group Seminar/Revision |

| |Motivating Employee Performance |

| | |

| |Leadership |

| |Communication In Organisations |

| |Group Seminar/Revision |

| |Employee Development |

| |Contemporary Social Responsibility & Business |

| |Ethics |

| |The workplace: Work Life Balance issues in the Twenty-first Century |

| |Group Seminar/Revision |

| |Understanding Managers and Management. |

| |Analysis of the Business Environment. PEST Information Management |

| |Group Seminar/Revision |

Module Title: Information Technologies and Systems

Module Lecturer: Denver Reynolds

1. Module Description:

This module involves a comprehensive study of the use of information systems for management. The module focuses on the development and effective use of management information systems in today's companys' decision-making and examination of traditional information systems development from the end-user's perspective. Emphasis will be on the understanding and practical application of information systems to enhance the organisation's effectiveness in achieving its goals.

The objective of this module is to enable students understand the use of applications software to develop individual applications that solve business problems. Investigate the opportunities and problems associated with computer-based management information system that will provide the background for determining the usefulness of computers to assist management in the planning and control of business operations.

2. Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the module the student will:

• Identify management information system application opportunities in business and industry.

• Understand the types of decisions that can be supported by computer-based IS applications.

• Describe the computer-based applications in the major functional areas of business, including accounting, finance, marketing, and manufacturing.

• Explain the issues involved in the development and deployment of management information systems.

• Perform the necessary requirements analysis for an MIS application.

• Outline the process for selecting information system software.

• Discern alternative software and hardware alternatives available for developing management information systems.

• Assess the current thrust of research in management information systems and related computing issues.

3. Indicative Content:

• Introduction to Information Systems, Competitive Advantage and Strategic Plan, Electronic Commerce

• International Business, Ethical Implications, Systems Thinking & Approach

• Methodologies and Tools

• Fundamentals of Computer Processing, Databases & DBMS

• Data Communications, Information Resources Information Systems

• Accounting Information Systems, Management Information Systems

• Decision Support, Executive Information Systems, Virtual Office

• IT Skills and Characteristics

4. Delivery

A variety of teaching approaches is used, including lectures, seminars, case analysis, teamwork and extensive use of the Internet for guided research.

Notional Student Workload

Lectures 18 hours

Seminars 7.5 hours

Directed Learning 15 hours

Independent Learning 40.5 hours

Formal Assessment 3 hours

Total 84 hours

5. Assessment

• 2 Assignments 100%

6. Concise Indicative Reading List:

Core Textbook:

• Laudon, K and Laudon, J (2010). Management Information Systems (11h Edn) Prentice Hall.

Recommended Additional Reading:

• Applegate, Lynda M.. (2003) Corporate Information Systems Management: Text and Cases, (6th edn), Irwin

• O'Brien, J, Marakas, G (2008) Management Information Systems, Mc GrawHill, New York

• McLeod, R. (2007) Management Information Systems, (10th Edn), Prentice Hall Publishing

7. Lecture Sequence

|Lecture |Topics | |

| | |Chapters |

| |Information Systems in Global Business Today |Chapter 1, Laudon and Laudon |

| |Understanding the effects of information systems on business and their | |

| |relationship to globalization. | |

| |Explain why information systems are so essential in business today. | |

| |Define an information system and describe its management, organization, and | |

| |technology components. | |

| |Define complementary assets and explain how they ensure that information | |

| |systems provide genuine value to an organization. | |

| |Global Business: How Businesses use Information System |Chapter 2, Laudon and Laudon |

| |Define and describe business processes and their relationship to information | |

| |systems. | |

| |Evaluate the role played by systems serving the various levels of management | |

| |in a business and their relationship to each other. | |

| |Explain how enterprise applications, collaboration and communication systems, | |

| |and intranets improve organizational performance. | |

| |Explain the difference between e-business, e-commerce, and e-government. | |

| |Group Seminar: Assignment Focus | |

| |Information Systems Organisation and Strategy |Chapter 3, Laudon and Laudon |

| |Identify and describe important features of organizations that managers need | |

| |to know about in order to build and use information systems successfully. | |

| |Demonstrate how Porter's competitive forces model helps companies develop | |

| |competitive strategies using information systems. | |

| |Group Seminar: Case study analysis | |

| |IT Infrastructure and Emerging Technologies |Chapter 5, Laudon and Laudon |

| |Define IT infrastructure and describe its components. | |

| |Identify and describe the stages and technology drivers of IT infrastructure | |

| |evolution. | |

| |Assess contemporary computer hardware platform trends. | |

| |Assess contemporary software platform trends. | |

| |Evaluate the challenges of managing IT infrastructure and management | |

| |solutions. | |

| |Foundations of Business Intelligence: Databases and Information management |Chapter 6, Laudon and Laudon |

| |Describe how the problems of managing data resources in a traditional file | |

| |environment are solved by a database management system | |

| |Describe the capabilities and value of a database management system | |

| |Evaluate tools and technologies for accessing information from databases to | |

| |improve business performance and decision making | |

| |Telecommunications, the Internet and Wireless technology |Chapter 7, Laudon and Laudon |

| |Identify the principal components of telecommunications networks and key | |

| |networking technologies. | |

| |Describe the main telecommunications transmission media and types of networks.| |

| |Explain how the Internet and Internet technology work and how they support | |

| |communication and e-business. | |

| |Identify the principal technologies and standards for wireless networking, | |

| |communication, and Internet access. | |

| |Assess the value to business of radio frequency identification (RFID) and | |

| |wireless sensor networks. | |

| |Group Seminar: Case study analysis | |

| |Securing Information Systems |Chapter 8, Laudon and Laudon |

| |Explain why information systems are vulnerable to destruction, error, and | |

| |abuse. | |

| |Assess the business value of security and control. | |

| |Identify the components of an organizational framework for security and | |

| |control. | |

| |Evaluate the most important tools and technologies for safeguarding | |

| |information resources. | |

| |Group Seminar: Case study analysis | |

| |Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy |Chapter 9, Laudon and Laudon |

| |Evaluate how enterprise systems help businesses achieve operational | |

| |excellence. | |

| |Describe how supply chain management systems coordinate planning, production, | |

| |and logistics with suppliers. | |

| |Explain how customers' relationship management systems help firms achieve | |

| |customer intimacy. | |

| |Identify the challenges posed by enterprise applications. | |

| |Describe how enterprise applications are used in platforms for new | |

| |cross-functional services. | |

| |ECommerce: Digital markets and Goods |Chapter 10, Laudon and Laudon |

| |Identify the unique features of e-commerce, digital markets, and digital | |

| |goods. | |

| |Describe how Internet technology has changed business models. | |

| |Identify the various types of e-commerce and explain how e-commerce has | |

| |changed consumer retailing and business-to-business transactions. | |

| |Evaluate the role of m-commerce in business, and describe the most important | |

| |m-commerce applications. | |

| |Identify the principal payment systems for electronic commerce. | |

| |Enhancing Decision making |Chapter 12, Laudon and Laudon |

| |Describe different types of decisions and the decision-making process. | |

| |Assess how information systems support the activities of managers and | |

| |management decision making. | |

| |Demonstrate how decision-support systems (DSS) differ from MIS and how they | |

| |provide value to the business. | |

| |Demonstrate how executive support systems (ESS) help senior managers make | |

| |better decisions. | |

| |Evaluate the role of information systems in helping people working in a group | |

| |make decisions more efficiently. | |

| |Group Seminar/ Revision | |



Get Better Grades Today

Join Essays24.com and get instant access to over 60,000+ Papers and Essays

closeLogin
Please enter your username and password
Username:
Password:
Forgot your password?