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Research On Early Father'S And Mother'S Involvement And Child'S Later Educational Outcomes

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Category: Social Issues

Autor: anton 14 September 2010

Words: 829 | Pages: 4

In 2004, the British Journal of Educational Psychology releases a report on a research that was conducted by Eirini Flouri and Ann Buchanan dealing with the correlation of early interaction of parents and the future assessment of their children in school. Previous to this article, little research was given to the individual long-term contribution that early parent involvement had in a child’s success in school. Flouri and Buchanan had three particular goals in mind while completing this research: (1) To explore the role of early father involvement in children's later educational attainment independently of the role of early mother involvement and other confounds, (2) to investigate whether gender and family structure moderate the relationship between father's and mother's involvement and child's educational attainment, and (3) to explore whether the impact of father's involvement depends on the level of mother's involvement (www.Ingentaselect.com). The study was provoked by the considerable amount of research presented by the United States that suggested that early father involvement would lead to positive outcomes in children; Flouri and Buchanan wanted to evaluate if this was the case in the United Kingdom (www.literacytrust.org.uk). The researchers had positivistic basis for obtaining their study. It was solely an attempt to reveal patterns and regularities dealing with the subject manner. They gave a secondary analysis of work that was deductive of longitudinal data collected (started in 1958) by the National Child Development Study. The Data provided by the National Child Development Study sampled 7,259 cohort members with valid data on mother involvement at age 7, father involvement at age 7, and school-leaving qualification by age 20. Of those, 3,303 were included in the final analysis (www.ingentaselect.com). The participation of the of the mother/ father was conveyed as an independent variable; were as child factors such as: emotional/ behavioral problems, cognitive ability and academic motivation are labeled as being the dependent

variable. The study mainly monitored the interaction between fathers and children at the ages of 7, 11, 16, and 33. Being considered an involved father is describe as a father who reads to his child, takes outings with his child, is interested in his child's education and takes a role equal to mother's in managing his child. He may or may not live with the child's mother, and he may or may not be the biological father to the child (www.literacytrust.org.uk). They presented their findings in a qualitative manner. The results were as followed:

1. Father involvement in childhood is associated with both good father-child relations in adolescence and later marital satisfaction in adult life, even after controlling for mother involvement, mother-child relations and known confounds.

2. Father involvement in childhood was negatively associated with adolescent delinquency in boys, even after controlling for mother involvement and known confounds.

3. Father involvement in childhood protected both against psychological maladjustment in adolescents in non-intact families, and against psychological distress in women in adult life, even after controlling for earlier psychological problems, mother involvement and known confounds.

4. Father involvement in childhood was strongly related with later educational attainment even after controlling for mother involvement and known confounds.

5. Father involvement in childhood was not independently related to use of state benefits receipt and subsidized housing in adult life when controlling for known confounds and mother involvement in childhood. However, father involvement in childhood was negatively related to an adult experience of homelessness in sons of manual workers.

6. Father involvement in childhood was not independently related to labor force participation in adult life when controlling for known confounds and mother involvement in childhood. Interestingly, however, men who had involved mothers when they were growing up were less likely to be unemployed than men with uninvolved mothers.

7. With older children father involvement was inversely related to family size and poor school performance. Financial difficulties in the family were not related to father involvement at either age. Domestic tension was negatively related to certain aspects of fathers' involvement with younger children. Father's education was generally related to father's involvement but maternal employment was only related to low father's interest in child's education at age 7 and 11. (www.literacytrust.org.uk).

The information gathered did support the hypothesis of the early involvement of the parent being beneficial to the scholastic assessment of children in the United Kingdom as well as the United States. The relationship between the two variables were quite positive as far as achievement in school. In other instances, such as the child’s ability to maintain a job, the presence or absence of a father was found to have no consequence at all.

As a result to their research, Flouri and Buchanan have planned to incorporate their findings into a book on fathering. They also hope their research will strike a chord with teachers, probation officers, psychologist, and sociologist (www.literacytrust.org.uk).

E., Flouri, A., Buchanan (2004) Early father's and mother's involvement and child's later educational outcomes. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 72 (2), 141-153.

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